Pacing

There are times when we’re asked (or we volunteer) to do a creative project that goes beyond ourselves. This would be something that takes an extended period of time and involves other people in the process. When this is the case, I’ve found that a large amount of planning and pacing is required to make sure you meet the final goal is effectively as possible.

For example, my wife and I are directing a theater production right now. Before we even had auditions, when we took plenty of time to plan when we would be “off book”, rehearsal schedules  and all the other elements that go into a stage production. Once we established the schedule, we were able to communicate that to the crew so they would know when to expect lighting and audio cues. They also knew when we would need various actors’ props. For the cast, we could communicate what scenes we were doing and the milestone we would have throughout.

If you ever begin a large creative endeavor, be sure and think through the pieces and steps as clearly as possible. Then communicate it to everyone involved and pace yourself to a successful completion.

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We have a very nice gold course where I live in Columbiana, Ohio - The Links at Firestone Farms. I caught these early morning tracks a few weeks ago.

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Another similarity between music and art

It’s interesting that the pitches in music are represented from left to right. The low tones are on the left and the high tones are on the right. You can see this easily when you look at a piano where the keys on the left are lower and as you go to the right the pitches get higher.

The same is true when it comes to the visual. Histograms are a sort of “scale” showing the overall tones of a photograph. Again, the darker tones are on the left and the lighter tones are on the right. The similarity between visual tones and musical pitches is easy to see when you compare a histogram to an equalizer layout:

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This old car was on a trailer in a parking lot. I love the gritty-ness and authenticity of it.

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More Similarities between art and music

I wrote in a previous post about layering and the similarities between music and art. This general idea was brought again to me after I downloaded an app called “Loopy”. It allows you to record a section of music and then progressively add to it until you have a multi-layered composition. The power comes when you begin to adjust each individual layer – volume, timbre, EQ, reverb - to make the finished piece exactly how you want it. (I’m not sure if Loopy does this yet).

There’s a similar dynamic with painting and graphic design. You begin with a base layer and then begin to work out subsequent layers as you go. This is especially true if you’re using a computer-based program like Photoshop. The layer editing for each of the programs even looks similar:

Each individual layer can be tweaked in any number of infinite ways to make the final result exactly what you envisioned. Of course, there are also times when the final result is a happy accident that turns out better that you even imagined.

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Another quick shot from my visit to the farm in Cherry Valley, OH. 

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Three Questions

I’m reading a book entitle “Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less” by Greg Mckeown. It talks about the importance of being deliberate in how you spend your time and eventually your life. I like it because it approaches time management not from “doing more in less time” but determining the essential things to do with the time you have.

In the beginning of the book he asks three questions that are worthy of asking yourself today:

What am I deeply passionate about?

What taps my talent?

What meets a significant need in the world?

What would your life look like if you carved out 30 minutes today to think about those questions?

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We spent a restful weekend at our favorite cabin in the woods in Knox County, Ohio last weekend.

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